Author Archives: Dominic Ellis

Sweet Chestnut coppicing this Sunday

domwhatcombewoods2smWondering how to take best advantage of the winter sun tomorrow? Well, we will be Sweet Chestnut coppicing in the beautiful Whatcome Woods… (Sunday 25th February).

Please come along between from 10am until about 3pm and you can to see how we are harvesting this valuable resource. We may well also be clefting it to make posts, rails, palings and laths. There should be a fire burning and a kettle on – bring a spud in tin foil and a mug!

There will also be the chance to help in the building of a brash deer fence to protect the new growth of the chestnut stools over the coming couple of years.

Our coup is Forestry Commission woodland so you’ll have to walk in – it’s about a mile with a couple of small(ish) hills along footpaths, bridleways and forestry tracks. Head for DT11 0AZ (there will be a COPPICING sign to show you the turning) and carry on driving down the track until you reach a large dog-leg curve where there is space for parking. There is a bridleway further down the track on the left that will take you into the woods on foot – the route will be sign posted with little cleft chestnut arrows with the Artisan heart in purple…

****Please be aware that we will be coppicing some large trees, felling them with chainsaws. Although all of our operatives take the greatest of care it is YOUR responsibility to keep out of harms way, follow all instructions and directions from our employees, be aware that when a chainsaw starts that a tree may be coming down. We cannot and will not be held responsible for any injuries to persons or property howsoever caused.***

whatcome woods

Sweet Chestnut coppicing at Whatcombe Wood

domwhatcombewoods2sm

domwhatcombewoods2smWe will be Sweet Chestnut coppicing in Whatcome Woods this weekend, from Friday 26th until Monday 29th.

Please come along between from 10am until about 3pm if you can to see how we are harvesting this valuable resource. We may well also be clefting it to make posts, rails, palings and laths. There should be a fire burning and a kettle on – bring a spud in tin foil and a mug!

There will also be the chance to help in the building of a brash deer fence to protect the new growth of the chestnut stools over the coming couple of years.

Our coup is Forestry Commission woodland so you’ll have to walk in – it’s about a mile with a couple of small(ish) hills along footpaths, bridleways and forestry tracks. Head for DT11 0AZ (there will be a COPPICING sign to show you the turning) and carry on driving down the track until you reach a large dog-leg curve where there is space for parking. There is a bridleway further down the track on the left that will take you into the woods on foot – the route will be sign posted.

****Please be aware that we will be coppicing some large trees, felling them with chainsaws. Although all of our operatives take the greatest of care it is YOUR responsibility to keep out of harms way, follow all instructions and directions from our employees, be aware that when a chainsaw starts that a tree may be coming down. We cannot and will not be held responsible for any injuries to persons or property howsoever caused.***

whatcome woods

Cleft Chestnut Rustic Garden Gate

Cleft chestnut rustic garden gate

So we’ve made a cleft chestnut rustic garden gate for a fencing contractor. It’s been a while and is good to get back into the swing again.

Cleft chestnut rustic garden gate Cleft chestnut rustic garden gate Cleft chestnut rustic garden gate Cleft chestnut rustic garden gate Cleft chestnut rustic garden gate

I started yesterday with a log of chestnut that we’d harvested from our coppice in the heart of Dorset. This I cleaved (split down the grain) for the stiles and rails. The rails are morticed into the stiles and fixed with cleft oak pegs. The diagonal brace was cleft from a bent log so it can bend round the rails and blind-morticed into the stiles for extra strength.

Sweet Chestnut is an incredibly resilient hardwood and this gate should last for many, many years with little or no maintenance.

Artisan Gardening will make your garden gates to order to suit your requirements. The gates are made from Sweet Chesnut that is cleft to size using traditional tools and methods. The gates are made using no metal fixings save the occasional brass screw.

Oak Driveway Gates

Asymmetric curved oak driveway gates

Here’s a recently completed pair of oak driveway gates made for a client that we met at the Stock Gaylard Oak Fair back in the summer. They feature curved rails and braces with asymmetric opening.

The gates are made from air dried oak to minimise movement as the timbers acclimatise and weather. All structural joints are mortice and tennon with oak draw dowels. The hinges and latches were forged at the Dorset Forge specifically to fit the curve of the rails. The gates have a sanded finish and have been treated to an undercoat and two top coats of OSMO UV Protection Oil.

 

 

Asymmetric curved oak driveway gatesAsymmetric curved oak driveway gates

 

« Older Entries